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Becoming Shapers of Context

I have come to believe that the outer space/context in which we work is only as open as is our inner space out of which we live. They are parallel processes. For me, this is part of the underbelly of leadership—the interior conversation that enables us to offer our best, deepest gifts, and to be shapers of context, rather than being shaped by the context.

Honoring Relationships

During difficult times, when divisiveness is pervasive, attention to the quality of relationships often suffers. In order to find a way forward, relationships must be honoring. A relationship is honoring when it provides space for authentic self-expression and seeks to not do violence to the Other because of the differences. A relationship is honoring, when it has as its highest priority the dignity of all.

Robustness and Vulnerability in Leadership and Ministry

In other words, when I enter a courageous conversation and find my anxiety rising, I remind myself that I have or will be given what I need to meet whatever or whoever emerges in the encounter. My primary task is to show up, to be present, and to pay attention; then, to offer what I can honestly and respectfully

Leading During Anxious Times: Choices for Clergy and Laity

This workshop will offer and explore different ways for leaders to see and understand leadership, human interactions and systems. Family systems and the theologian Martin Buber’s I-Thou work are key lenses as we look at the theology, theory and best practices for leaders.

A Half-Fast Walk through Martin Buber’s Thinking

The minister, leader, counselor or facilitator does not take security for granted, nor does he or she use theory or theology to substitute for the encounter. The challenge is to be fully present in the “nothing else than process without getting lost in the abyss”

Lent and Confession: A Model for Individuals and Leaders

Declaring a new dispensation by confession, we see our trespasses against others in a new light, initiated by something we were hiding not only from the world but also from ourselves. Holding the secret was not only a defense against punishment but also a holding back from our next outrageous step. To separate the confusion of punishment with revelation, we first of all confess to ourselves, step onto solid ground in the privacy and spaciousness of our own hearts, minds and moral imaginations and then translate it into the best speech we have to represent it in the world.